Difference between revisions of "Consent to Create Binding"

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==Full Title==
 
==Full Title==
  
The definition of a message to carry consent from a subject to a Credential Device Provider.
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The definition of a message to carry consent from a subject to a Credential Service Provider.
 +
 
 +
===Goals===
 +
The goal is a certificate in the hands of the user which meets the security requirements of the intended purpose.
 +
 
 +
===Status===
 +
This page is a work in process towards a work item proposal.
  
 
==Context==
 
==Context==
In an environment where a subject is requesting the establishment of a binding between it's private key and an Provider of any identifier services, the implicit assumption is that the action of the subject on the website is sufficient. In today's world of gathering a subject's most private information some better means of capturing subject consent is urgently needed.
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In an environment where a subject is requesting the establishment of a binding between it's private key and a Provider of any identifier services, the implicit assumption has been that the action of the subject on the website is sufficient. In today's world of gathering a subject's most private information some better means of capturing subject consent is urgently needed.
 +
===Existing Methods===
 +
# While it is true that methods exist for individual subjects to acquire a certificate for signing emails and receiving encrypted email, the adoption of that method outside of th enterprise is essentially failed and will not be considered as a paradigm for this effort.
 +
# The most common request today is for an SSL or EV certificate from a Certificate Authority (CA) which works reasonably well for what it is intended to do. While it is possible to set up a CA of your own, we will address the more common case of a CA that has been approved by the major browser vendors. Before the process begins the user selects a Distinguished Name for the site based on the rules established by the CA/B forum.
 +
# A CSR is an encoded file that provides you with a standardized way to send the Certificate Authority your public key as well as some information that identifies your company and domain name. When you generate a CSR, most server software asks for the following information: common name (e.g., www.example.com), organization name and location (country, state/province, city/town), key type (typically RSA), and key size (2048-bit minimum).
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===NIST levels of Assurance===
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* [https://pages.nist.gov/800-63-3/ The NIST 800-63-3 document site]
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* [https://tcwiki.azurewebsites.net/index.php?title=Assurance Levels of assurance from NIST 800-63-3 are described here]
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===External Definitions used here===
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* Credential Service Provider = A trusted entity that issues or '''registers subscriber authenticators''' and '''issues electronic credentials to subscribers'''. A CSP may be an independent third party or issue credentials for its own use.
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==Problems==
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Prevention of attacks (exploits)
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 +
==Solution==
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The following is the current understanding of what needs to be included in a Consent for Binding Request.
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 +
Subject<blockquote>MANDITORY - this is the identifier from the user that will be the subject of the binding. It serves nearly the same purpose as the the DN of the X.509 certificate. Whether this subject identifier is to be bound to a real world entity (like a human being) is to be determined by the purposes to which the resulting entity statement will be put.</blockquote>
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Subject Contact and other information<blockquote>OPTIONAL - although a contact email might be a requirement for notices.</blockquote>
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Issuer<blockquote>MANDITORY - URi OF the CSP (Audience of the request).</blockquote>
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Consents<blockquote>MANDITORY - applies to above subject information. This is purely opt-in. No reference denotes no consent.</blockquote>
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Device Statement<blockquote>MANDITORY for AAL2 and higher certifications. It is used by the CSP to verify the level of protection provided to the Private key of the certificate.</blockquote>
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Identity Proof<blockquote>MANDITORY - although it might pass responsibility to the CSP it it is willing and able to provide it for the subject. The content of the proof might need to meet specific requirements in IAL2 and higher assurance credentials. This is an array so that more than one proofing document may be included. Note that the legal jurisdiction or address of the subject identifier may be part of this structure.</blockquote>
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Purpose<blockquote>MANDATORY for any level of assurance greater than level one in any of the 3 categories of assurance.</blockquote>
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ACR<blockquote>OPTIONAL - this is only useful in the case where the Purpose is not adequate to establish the required levels of assurance of the resulting Entity Statement.</blockquote>
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Issue Date<blockquote>MANDITORY - Linux epoch date is default</blockquote>
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Expiration Date<blockquote>MANDITORY - Linux epoch date is default</blockquote>
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Subject Public Key<blockquote>MANDITORY - must be included directly or by reference.</blockquote>
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Signature<blockquote>MANDITORY - using the above key.</blockquote>
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Encryption<blockquote>MANDITORY??? - using the CSP key.</blockquote>
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Entity Statement<blockquote>NOT PART OF REQUEST - this is the message returned by the CSP after the process has been completed. It is then made available to any legitimate request. It is signed by a well-known key belonging the the CSP.</blockquote>
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==References==
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* [https://www.globalsign.com/en/blog/what-is-a-certificate-signing-request-csr/ List of CSR contents.]
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[[Category:Profile]]
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[[Category:Trust]]
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[[Category:Privacy]]

Revision as of 19:44, 9 September 2019

Full Title

The definition of a message to carry consent from a subject to a Credential Service Provider.

Goals

The goal is a certificate in the hands of the user which meets the security requirements of the intended purpose.

Status

This page is a work in process towards a work item proposal.

Context

In an environment where a subject is requesting the establishment of a binding between it's private key and a Provider of any identifier services, the implicit assumption has been that the action of the subject on the website is sufficient. In today's world of gathering a subject's most private information some better means of capturing subject consent is urgently needed.

Existing Methods

  1. While it is true that methods exist for individual subjects to acquire a certificate for signing emails and receiving encrypted email, the adoption of that method outside of th enterprise is essentially failed and will not be considered as a paradigm for this effort.
  2. The most common request today is for an SSL or EV certificate from a Certificate Authority (CA) which works reasonably well for what it is intended to do. While it is possible to set up a CA of your own, we will address the more common case of a CA that has been approved by the major browser vendors. Before the process begins the user selects a Distinguished Name for the site based on the rules established by the CA/B forum.
  3. A CSR is an encoded file that provides you with a standardized way to send the Certificate Authority your public key as well as some information that identifies your company and domain name. When you generate a CSR, most server software asks for the following information: common name (e.g., www.example.com), organization name and location (country, state/province, city/town), key type (typically RSA), and key size (2048-bit minimum).

NIST levels of Assurance

External Definitions used here

  • Credential Service Provider = A trusted entity that issues or registers subscriber authenticators and issues electronic credentials to subscribers. A CSP may be an independent third party or issue credentials for its own use.

Problems

Prevention of attacks (exploits)

Solution

The following is the current understanding of what needs to be included in a Consent for Binding Request.

Subject
MANDITORY - this is the identifier from the user that will be the subject of the binding. It serves nearly the same purpose as the the DN of the X.509 certificate. Whether this subject identifier is to be bound to a real world entity (like a human being) is to be determined by the purposes to which the resulting entity statement will be put.
Subject Contact and other information
OPTIONAL - although a contact email might be a requirement for notices.
Issuer
MANDITORY - URi OF the CSP (Audience of the request).
Consents
MANDITORY - applies to above subject information. This is purely opt-in. No reference denotes no consent.
Device Statement
MANDITORY for AAL2 and higher certifications. It is used by the CSP to verify the level of protection provided to the Private key of the certificate.
Identity Proof
MANDITORY - although it might pass responsibility to the CSP it it is willing and able to provide it for the subject. The content of the proof might need to meet specific requirements in IAL2 and higher assurance credentials. This is an array so that more than one proofing document may be included. Note that the legal jurisdiction or address of the subject identifier may be part of this structure.
Purpose
MANDATORY for any level of assurance greater than level one in any of the 3 categories of assurance.
ACR
OPTIONAL - this is only useful in the case where the Purpose is not adequate to establish the required levels of assurance of the resulting Entity Statement.
Issue Date
MANDITORY - Linux epoch date is default
Expiration Date
MANDITORY - Linux epoch date is default
Subject Public Key
MANDITORY - must be included directly or by reference.
Signature
MANDITORY - using the above key.
Encryption
MANDITORY??? - using the CSP key.
Entity Statement
NOT PART OF REQUEST - this is the message returned by the CSP after the process has been completed. It is then made available to any legitimate request. It is signed by a well-known key belonging the the CSP.

References